DrukPemaKarpoMenkhung

A medical facility operated and managed by the nuns and volunteers of Druk Amitabha Mountain for the benefit of the community under the direction of His Holiness Gyalwang Drukpa.

The Druk White Lotus Burns Care Course

Written by Jigme Yudron Lhamo
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Every day 16,000 people die from injuries including burn injuries and these account for 16% of the global burden of disease. (WHO 2004) (T. Potokar from Interburns. Editorial: Paediatric Burn Injuries—Tomorrow is Too Late. Burns 2005;31:401)

Burns Care Courses Delivered at Amitabha:

A Drukpa Response to a Local and Global Problem


The Essential Burns Care Course was delivered at Druk Pema Karpo Clinic on October 6th and 7th, 2010. The courses were delivered byInterburnsa specialist UK based charity, joined by a consortium of doctors and healthcare professionals from the UK, Australia and Nepal.

The teachers from Interburns were Dr Shobha Chamania, Chief of Burn Unit Choithram Hospital, Indore, India, Dr. Chamania’s husband, Dr. Shekhar Chamania, retired General Surgeon, Dr. Tom Potokar, Plastic Surgeon, Welsh Centre for Burns and Plastic Surgery, UK and Dr. Shariq Ali, Former Head of Department, Burns Centre Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, now practicing in accident and trauma medicine in the UK.

Other teachers assisting the Interburns team were Sister Nara Devi, Head Nurse in the Burns Unit at Bir Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal, Dr. Sian Falder, Consultant Plastic Surgery 
Alder Hey Children's NHS Foundation Liverpool UK and Dr. Remo Papini, a consultant plastic and reconstructive surgeon at the University Hospital Birmingham, Birmingham Children’s Hospital and Birmingham Heartlands and Solihull NHS Trust.

Also teaching was Fiona Procter, lead Occupational therapist for burns Alder Hey Children’s Hospital UK and assisting Fiona was Jean Stewart, an Australian physiotherapist based in Melbourne.

The Course Facilitator was Ms Kellie Williamson (Choying Dolma).

Before the course began, we went into the villages around Druk Amitabha Mountain to do reconnaissance and to invite anyone who was willing to come to the clinic for treatment. We also did the setup and organisation of equpiment and resources. Before the course began, we went into the villages around Druk Amitabha Mountain to do reconnaissance and to invite anyone who was willing to come to the clinic for treatment. We also did the setup and organisation of equpiment and resources. Before the course began, we went into the villages around Druk Amitabha Mountain to do reconnaissance and to invite anyone who was willing to come to the clinic for treatment. We also did the setup and organisation of equpiment and resources. Before the course began, we went into the villages around Druk Amitabha Mountain to do reconnaissance and to invite anyone who was willing to come to the clinic for treatment. We also did the setup and organisation of equpiment and resources. Before the course began, we went into the villages around Druk Amitabha Mountain to do reconnaissance and to invite anyone who was willing to come to the clinic for treatment. We also did the setup and organisation of equpiment and resources. Before the course began, we went into the villages around Druk Amitabha Mountain to do reconnaissance and to invite anyone who was willing to come to the clinic for treatment. We also did the setup and organisation of equpiment and resources. Before the course began, we went into the villages around Druk Amitabha Mountain to do reconnaissance and to invite anyone who was willing to come to the clinic for treatment. We also did the setup and organisation of equpiment and resources. Before the course began, we went into the villages around Druk Amitabha Mountain to do reconnaissance and to invite anyone who was willing to come to the clinic for treatment. We also did the setup and organisation of equpiment and resources. Before the course began, we went into the villages around Druk Amitabha Mountain to do reconnaissance and to invite anyone who was willing to come to the clinic for treatment. We also did the setup and organisation of equpiment and resources. Before the course began, we went into the villages around Druk Amitabha Mountain to do reconnaissance and to invite anyone who was willing to come to the clinic for treatment. We also did the setup and organisation of equpiment and resources.

What Happened on the First Day

Interburn’s signature ‘Essential Burns Care’ course was taught on the first day. The Druk White Lotus Clinic had invited a total of 40 healthcare professionals from Kathmandu and surrounds to attend. Participants included general and plastic surgeons, nurses and physiotherapists.

On this blue-sky day at the Druk White Lotus Clinic the team of teachers delivered a cutting edge course to a room full of appreciative healthcare professionals. The teachers taught with a sense of joy and purpose, creating an uplifting feeling amongst all the participants.

In keeping with Interburns style of having local health professionals help deliver their courses, the Clinic was also honoured to have Sister Nara Devi, who is Head Nurse in the Burns unit at Bir Hospital (Kathmandu’s largest hospital).


What was Taught

A range of themes were covered during the day of the EBC course and included the following topics:

Burn management, rapid and accurate assessment of burn patients needs, resuscitation and stabilization of burn patients, psychology of burns patients and healing, burn prevention strategies and how to run First Aid programs. Participants were also shown best practice assessment and management of minor burn wounds and their problems e.g. infection, scarring, contractures etc. and how to organise basic burn care in his her hospital. Also covered was how to make splints from local materials such as drainpipes and cardboard boxes, countering the need for expensive foreign materials. Prevention also figured throughout the day, with many ideas discussed. Also covered was the psychological aspect to burn injury and recovery and the difficulties associated with re-assimilation back into society.

The Interburns team taught by means of lectures, practical skill stations, demonstrations, role-play scenarios, small group discussions and interactive brainstorming sessions. The participants found the course entertaining as well as informative.


What Happened on the Second Day

On the second day, the same Interburns team taught the Basic Burns Care Course to a group of 28 Drukpa nuns. The entire faculty generously donated their time to teach this adapted course to the aspiring group of nuns and The Druk White Lotus Clinic is most grateful for the time and effort invested by everyone involved.

 

What was Taught

The Basic Burns Care Course included elements of the Essential Burns Care Course taught the previous day, but also covered basic first aid, dressings, burns prevention, the psychological damage of burn injuries and information on electrocution and cooking safety. The participants were also taught about ‘STOP, DROP and ROLL,’ a technique used in the situation where the body catches fire.



A Few Interesting Things About the Event

The Doctors and physiotherapists who taught the course stayed in the Amitabha Guest House for the duration of the course. They attended puja in the Temple a couple of times and watched the nuns practice their Kung Fu. They enjoyed a tour of the medical clinic and of Amitabha Abbey. We all enjoyed delicious food prepared by the caterer from The Annapurna Hotel.

Transportation was co-ordinated by Indra Munankarmi of Damaru Travels.

The teaching event at Amitabha Abbey was sponsored by Bairo Ling Australia which provided transportation from Kathmandu to the Abbey, food, and all of the facilitators costs.

Sincere thanks go to the following:

Interburns, The McComb Foundation, Dr. Fiona Wood, The Burns Unit Royal Perth Hospital, Dr. Hilary Wallace and The Burn Injury Research Unit UWA and The British Council/THET International Health Links: Kanti - Alder Hey Burns Link.


What People Had to Say About the Courses


I must tell you, and I know that I am echoing from all interburns team that it was one of the most relaxing Essential burn care courses which we did at Amitabha. I personally have felt very calmed down within, rejuvenated with all the fresh air, silence and peace, ambience of the meditation with nuns, enjoying their rituals and Kung fu and sharing with them the basic burn care course. I wish to take this opportunity to specially thank you and Hillary for providing us great food all the time. Special thanks are due to Urgyen for his excelent support for audio visuals which went off very smoothly.
–Dr Shobha Chamania, Chief of Burn Unit Choithram Hospital, Indore, India

It is wonderful to see the enthusiasm you have to serve the humanity and to minimise burns related suffering. With your meticulous organisational strengths and commitment, I can see a lot of good in the area of Burns prevention and rehabilitation in future. It does not matter which venue you choose for this work. It may be Ladakh or anywhere it is needed but the effort will be truly noble and I am sure your efforts will ultimately result in achieving a better Karma for this world.

Tom & Shobha specialise a great deal in prevention and rehabilitation strategies and please do not hesitate to be in touch with us and it would be a pleasure to assist in any way we can.

We learned a lot from our stay in Monastery and I am grateful to His Holiness and to you and to all of our wonderful students and everyone who gave us this wonderful and spiritually moving opportunity. Thanks once again.

–Dr. Shariq Ali, Former Head of Department, Burns Centre Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi

We learned Yoga, we showed the Doctors our Kung Fu and they also did it with us. We learned Stop, drop and roll, about how to do dressings, how to wear an apron on for cooking so our clothes don’t go on the flame. The Doctors said to us ‘wear chapels for electrical’ and they told us about electrical safety. One lady told about how to do splinting, and stretch hand out. Elevate hand up, not down. Run under cold water 15 minutes for big burns, 10 minutes for babies, not long other wise baby will get sick.

Don’t put candles on a cloth put them on safety place like a tile or cement. Be careful with lanterns, don’t leave the flame exposed, you must cover the flame with glass or metal to protect it from cloth catching fire on it. They showed us a movie with one boy who was flying a kite and the kite got stuck between the trees. The boy climbed up to take his kite and touched an exposed electrical wire that was up there and he died.

I also heard many voices crying on an African recording. It was really painful for the boy. I felt very sad to hear. I also learned if we hold a pot, don’t do it with our own clothes, use a separate cloth.

They showed us photos of other burnt people. We talked about how it was important not to reject people who have burns, always give them smiles and be friends with them and help them in every way. Don’t let them feel lonely.

And I also watched many photos of burn children. Many of them are babies. For a moment I thought this is my pains, and I closed my eyes and thought for those peoples who are suffering. I thought no one was suffering like that. I still pray for them and all the sentients beings.

The course was enjoyable and I learned many things. Now whenever burns will happen, I can help others and me too. Thank you

–Jigme Migyur Palmo, Druk Gawa Khilwa Abbey Nun

Additional Information about the Significance of Burns Injury Care and Rehabilitation


Interburns which has been active in Bangladesh, Africa and India with much success, and specialises in the delivery of courses that aim to provide the knowledge to improve the care of burn victims, informs us that:

‘Burn injury is a global problem, but more than 90% of burns occur in resource poor countries and 70% in children, most of these are seen and treated by non burn specialists. The vast majority of these burns are survivable, many preventable, and with appropriate treatment the incidence of debilitating scars and contractures can be reduced.

In high-income countries in the best centers, people with up to 90% of their bodies burned can be saved, in countries such as Nepal, patients with 40% burns die. Many children die from complications of burn injuries; many more are left with horrendous scars, both physical and psychological.

Physical scarring can cause limbs to contract, leaving a child disabled. A disabled child becomes a disabled adult with poor prospects for marriage, work and even education, and many become dependant and demoralised. Burn care is not glamorous. It is hard, long-term, intensive, time-consuming work. Outcomes can be poor because scar tissue replaces healthy skin. People with extensive, and even moderate burn injures are often given no hope. Despite the fact that many burns in children are small, the consequences of inappropriate treatment are huge, causing preventable disability and disfigurement.

Patients are often then left in a corner of a ward, dressings soiled, in pain and ignored because no one knows what to do. Death is not uncommon, sometimes after weeks of hope and effort. Yet simple, cheap and effective treatment of burns can save lives and prevent untold suffering.

Last Updated on 02 November 2010